All events are held at the Latinx Research Center, 2547 Channing Way in Berkeley, a wheelchair accessible venue that is open to the public.

 

Spring 2020 Events

Tuesday,

January 28

12:30-2pm

New Research

Spirit of Fight: Decolonizing Art, the African American / Latinx context

(1963-1983)

Dr. Mauricio Barros de Castro, Associate Professor State University of Rio de Janeiro, Art Institute

This lecture will discuss the trajectory and artworks of three artists, Faith Ringgold, Rupert García and Abdias do Nascimento, between 1963 and 1893, during the most important period of the Black Power Movement. The artworks of these artists present other aesthetics based on race and ethnicity and contribute to decolonizing eurocentric Art History.

 

Friday,

February 7

4-6pm

February Exhibition Opening

“Tell Me Why My Children Died”: Photograph Exhibition of the

Venezuelan Warao Indigenous Community Health Crisis

Circle of dialogue between local and resident Indigenous Elders, health activists, scholars, and Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley, Dr. Charles Briggs and Dr. Clara Mantini-Briggs, a Venezuelan public health physician and Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at UC Berkeley.

Between 2007 and 2008, mysterious deaths began appearing in indigenous Warao communities in the Delta Amacuro rainforest of Venezuela. In some families, two or three children died. Baffled, the local doctor sent patients to advanced care facilities, where they were seen by specialists, but no diagnosis emerged. Parents pushed local leaders Conrado and Enrique Moraleda to act. When health officials seemed more interested in hiding than solving the mystery, they formed their own investigatory team, recruiting healer Tirso Gómez, nurse Norbelys Gómez, Venezuelan physician Clara Mantini-Briggs, and anthropologist Charles Briggs. The Moraledas could see that a major reason that health professionals had failed to produce a diagnosis was that they had excluded the parents as active participants in producing knowledge. The team held meetings in all affected communities; parents publicly performed narratives that demanded recognition of the value of their children’s lives and the tragedy of their deaths, simultaneously sharing the archives of knowledge they had compiled. Their rich accounts enabled Mantini-Briggs to provide a presumptive diagnosis of bat-transmitted rabies. The team presented findings to the national health ministry in the capital, demanding recognition of indigenous rights to participate in producing knowledge about health and shaping policies and practices.

The parents repeatedly told the team that “we want lots of people to know about our children.” Knowing the power of visual images, they asked Charles Briggs to take photographs. Mantini-Briggs and Gómez treated one young woman, Elbia Torres Rivas, who was dying from the disease; her family requested photo-documentation of her illness, wake, and funeral. Exhibiting these photographs responds to the parents’ calls for recognition and efforts to connect with the struggles of other oppressed peoples, particularly indigenous communities. Bringing this exhibition to Berkeley and holding workshops and performance-oriented events could open doors to rich collaborations with Ohlone and other indigenous and migrant communities, thereby connecting practices of mourning and community-based efforts to create more just health policies and practices.

 

Tuesday,

February 11

12:30-2pm

New Research

“A Cipher Joined to Simulacra”: Representing Indigenous Resistance

across the Americas

Dr. Enrique Lima, Lecturer in Native American Studies at UC Berkeley

Beginning with Columbus and continuing to present-day popular culture, the “idea of the Indian” has retained a powerful hold on the imagination of non-Native people. Indigenous writers throughout the Americas have challenged those depictions, catalogued their destructive and dehumanizing effects, and demanded the right to represent their own realities. Lima’s new research asks can Native writers also be seduced by the “idea of the Indian”? What problems emerge when Native writers fictionalize abstract “Indians,” even when they do so in the service of Indigenous resistance? This lecture considers these and related questions in terms of the works of D’Arcy McNickle, Louise Erdrich, and José María Arguedas.

 

Thursday,

February 20

4-6pm

New Research

The Future of Demographobia, Latinxs, and the Realist-Speculative Convergence

Dr. Elda María Román, Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Southern California

In this lecture, Elda María Román first discusses how media and scholars are engaging with the current wave of demographobia, which Sami Alim defines as “the irrational fear of changing demographics.” Since speculative fiction can creatively play out “what if?” scenarios, Román turns to speculative dystopian texts, America Libre, Ink, and Elysium that envision what would happen if demographobia toward Latinxs and other people of color continues to amplify. Román argues that these texts register what she calls the realist-speculative convergence, which enables us to understand the point at which what previously seemed improbable no longer is. Attuning to this point of convergence in texts revolving around demographobia reveals how close we are to extreme measures of population control, and what mechanisms might be reintroduced or developed to contain people as well as resources.

Co-sponsored by the English Department at UC Berkeley

 

Friday,

February 28

4-6pm

Book Lecture

 “Voices from the Ancestors: Xicanx and Latinx Spiritual Expressions and Healing Practices” Book Lecture with the Editors of the Ontology

Dr. Lara Medina, professor in the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies at California State University

Dr. Martha R. Gonzales, lecturer in the Ethnic Studies Department at Glendale Community College, Glendale, California

Voices from the Ancestors brings together the reflective writings and spiritual practices of Xicanx, Latinx, and Afro-Latinx womxn and male allies in the United States who seek to heal from the historical traumas of colonization by returning to ancestral traditions and knowledge.

Co-sponsored by the Multicultural Community Center “MCC” and Alianza at UC Berkeley

 

Thursday,

March 5

4-6pm

New Research

 

 

Participatory DemoXracy and Performance in Venezuela Today

Darwin “Niky” García, Director, International Theater Festival of Caracas

A panel discussion with Darwin “Niky” García and Jerico Montilla (Theater Director, Actor) on performance arts in the participatory socialist democracy of Venezuela. Based on experience of over twenty years of producing circus and popular theater in both urban and rural contexts in Venezuela, these accomplished artists will share insights on the possibilities and limits of organizing popular power through arts-based practice and assembly. Their work as international touring artists and organizers in the heart of the revolutionary movement in Venezuela offers a rare opportunity to hear a nuanced and informed perspective on socialist arts and politics in the present day.

Talk is accessible in both Spanish and English with simultaneous translation.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

 

 

Tuesday,

Mar 17

12:30-2pm

Book Lecture

The King of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina, Lost Prophet of the Chicano Movement

Dr. Lorena Oropeza, professor of history at the University of California, Davis

In 1967, Reies López Tijerina led an armed takeover of a New Mexico courthouse in the name of recouping land rights for Spanish-speaking locals. The small-scale raid thrust Tijerina and his cause into the national spotlight, catalyzing an entire generation of activists. The lecture explains how Tijerina developed an anti-colonial analysis that labeled the United States was an aggressive empire that had conquered and colonized the Southwest and subsequently wrenched land away from border people—Mexicans and Native Americans alike. Yet in tracing Tijerina’s revelatory historical analysis to the years he spent as a Pentecostal preacher and his hidden past as a self-proclaimed prophet of God, the lecture directly addresses allegations of physical and sexual abuse to show p how Tijierina’s political achievements rested upon the subordination of women, specifically his wives and daughters.

Co-sponsored by the Ethnic Studies, Chicano/a Studies Program, and the English and History Departments at UC Berkeley

Tuesday,

Mar 31

12:30-2pm

Film Lecture

Fighting to Not Be Forgotten: 27 Years of Feminicides in Ciudad Juárez 

A film discussion by Raúl Varela: Anthropologist, filmmaker, photographer, and musician

In his first full-length documentary film, Varela explores how organized crime, conglomerate corporations, and the Mexican government continue to be part of a lethal underground machine that aims to use, abuse, and dispose of the female body in the Border city of Ciudad Juárez, México. This documentary film follows the story of Norma and Silvia, the mothers of Idaly and Fabiola who disappeared in 2010. After becoming victims of sex trafficking, Idaly and Fabiola’s fragments of bones were later found and identified through DNA analyses. “Fighting to Not Be Forgotten” follows the perilous journey that mothers like Norma and Silvia embark on, as activists demanding answers and justice from the authorities, and fight to keep the memory of their daughters alive.

Tuesday,

Apr 14

12:30-2pm

New Research

Neighborhoods and Ethnic Conflict

Dr. Martin Sanchez-Jankowski, Director of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues and Chair of the Center for Ethnographic Research at UC Berkeley

Ethnic conflict within urban neighborhoods of the United States has been historically quite common. When it has more recently involved Latinos what are the contours in which it has occurred?

Tuesday

April 28

12:30-2pm

New Research

Beyond Cynicism: Race, Immigration, and Latinx Trust in Government

Dr. Cristina Mora, Associate Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley

We live in a cynical age, and although much has been written about trust in government, few have theorized about how race mediates such beliefs. On the one hand, volumes of research show that race is a strong predictor of political attitudes. On the other, theories about trust, and trust in government specifically, tend to overlook issues of race, while survey research on the issue yields mixed findings. Drawing on survey data as well as 70 in-depth interviews with US Latinos in two metropolitan areas, we delineate how racialization is a foundational lens through which Latinxs express distrust in government, envision ideal conceptualizations of the state, and express hope in change. Latinxs in our study feel both targeted and neglected by government institutions, and express a collectivist orientation towards the state. Our study has implications for understanding how categorization and power structure beliefs about the state.

New research by Profesor Cristina Mora in collaboration with the Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS).

TBA

Semester Closing Event

 

Spring Pachanga

 

 

 

Previous Events at the LRC